Copper CRM

CRM

Updated January 10, 2019

1 updates


SCORE BREAKDOWN

User Interface

25/25

Cost

21/25

Differentiation

22/25

Effectiveness

20/25

Pros

  • “Google Recommended” platform
  • Extremely easy to use
  • Competitively priced

Cons

  • Not for organizations that don’t utilize Google Suite
  • Integrations and premium support limited by subscription
  • Pipeline and automation features can be technically limited

Copper, previously named ProsperWorks, is a cloud-based customer relationship management (CRM) software-as-a-service (SaaS) platform built as an external tool for Google Suite and Apps customers. Recommended as a “Google friendly” application by the search engine giant, Copper has a full G Suite integration that communicates between the various productivity apps.

Copper, a CRM for Google

Copper is a CRM platform recommended for users of the Google Suite ecosystem. Rahul Sood, the managing director for the Google Apps and Search at Work programs, even endorses Copper as a “Google Recommended” platform. Sood, in his testimony on Copper’s website, states: “With Copper, sales teams can interact with their customers from within Gmail and Google Hangouts; and work on customer proposals and sales forecasts with Google Docs and Drive.” Given this interaction, Copper is a very versatile tool.

Since Copper is a CRM built for Google, organizations, teams, and individuals who don’t have Google workflow or utilize G Suite applications will not have any utility for the tool. If G Suite is not an option, users should look at ZoHo CRM Plus or others for an alternative CRM experience.

Think tanks and nonprofits

Because most CRMs are used for sales or lead management, Copper is also a viable solution for nonprofits, think tanks, and advocacy groups fielding robust donor programs. In all honesty, Copper isn’t built for the tech stacks one would find among political campaigns and advocacy field operations.

Technical framework

The Copper platform itself is a separate browser-based web app that integrates into the Google ecosystem through external integration, custom API, free mobile applications (for Android and Apple devices), and Chrome extensions. Due to its native focus on Google software, Copper requires users to utilize Chrome browsers for the best performance. Though the app can be used on Opera or Firefox, the platform can be used with technology that it was intended for. Other than that, Copper works like a traditional CRM. Users can manage tasks, track correspondence, identify and address leads, and automate workflows.

User interface and ease of use

One of the unique aspects about Copper is its relative ease of use. During our tests of the mobile and browser experiences, there were few obstacles to understanding the platform and how it works. According to user reviews on G2 Crowd, the G Suite Marketplace, Capterra, FitSmallBusiness, and SoftwareAdvice, Copper is popular because it’s straightforward. While we weren’t fans of the color scheme or app skins, these aesthetic elements don’t complicate navigation.

Copper also has pipeline and automation mapping features for users, aligned with those found with most CRMs. We did find the mapping features lackluster and missing the robustness of full stack automation brought with enterprise-level CRMs like Salesforce.

Integrations and support

Copper can be integrated with external software other than G Suite and other Google apps. These various integrations include data hookups for the industry-standard reporting and analytics features. Data sources vary from traditional CSV file imports and exports to social media and database software. Collaboration tools like Slack are also available with CRM, marketing automation software (e.g., Mailchimp, etc.), and accounting software (e.g., Xero and Quickbooks). Additionally, Copper caters to developers with an open API.

Despite the variety of integrations available to users, Copper restricts integration based on subscription tiers. For example, the “Basic” plan only allows users to utilize the native G Suite integration, Slack, and Zapier. Integrations are further granted as subscription tiers increase in cost. This pricing and access scheme also regulates support, admin, and reporting capabilities. On the support front, base users are only given access to the Copper knowledge base for DIY troubleshooting and an online chat line in-platform. “Professional” and “Business” subscribers are given customized onboarding, customer success managers, and concierge tech support. Alternatively, Agile CRM and ZoHo CRM both offer full platform functionality for free and low-tier subscribers without significant markups and additional costs.

Pricing

Copper offers a 14-day free trial period with full use of the platform. When it comes time to upgrade, plans begin at $19 per user per month for “Basic” subscribers. “Professional” subscribers can purchase plans beginning at $49 per user per month. “Business” users pay $119 per user per month on an annual basis. As we mentioned above, Agile CRM and ZoHo CRM have better values for user licenses at lower prices beginning at $8.99 and $12, respectively.

What we think

Despite our complaints about the payment and access structure, Copper is an excellent CRM. It requires very little time to deploy and its built to integrate with Google apps and G Suite tools natively. Between the ease of use and the particular cross-platform nature of the apparatus, organizations of all types can find aspects of this CRM that are enjoyable.

If you have any feedback on this review or you would like to suggest an app for us to review, please drop us a note – telegraph@joinlincoln.org.


Screenshots

SCORE BREAKDOWN

User Interface

25/25

Cost

21/25

Differentiation

22/25

Effectiveness

20/25

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