Basecamp 3

Task management

Senate
Approved

House
Approved

Updated August 29, 2018

1 updates


Senate
Approved

House
Approved

SCORE BREAKDOWN

User Interface

18/25

Cost

20/25

Differentiation

24/25

Effectiveness

21/25

Pros

  • Flat rates for entire team
  • Open API

Cons

  • Outdated UX inhibits collaboration and desktop/mobile integrations

A modern and connected congressional office could benefit from the unified dashboard experience of Basecamp 3. This project management application, though lacking some complexity and visual updates, can assist with populating non-classified office workflows for all to see.

An attempt at all-in-one collaboration

Millions in the private sector love Basecamp 3. State and local governments have also deployed Basecamp as a project management platform for their teams. The application houses a chat application, a task manager, a collaborative space, and document manager–among other features–in one platform. However, this broad array of features stunts Basecamp 3’s functionality as a marketing and communication tool.

Basecamp 3 can be accessed on any desktop or  Apple and Android mobile devices.

API and integration

Congressional users of Basecamp 3 have access to the integrations and software connectors that augment the experience of the platform. Keep in mind that using the platform with external integrations requires approval of the third-party tool by congressional regulators.

Luckily, Basecamp provides developers with an open API and software kit available via GitHub. Individual congressional offices can coordinate with House Information Resources (HIR) and the proper vendors to deploy a customized integration for the platform and any other congressional-approved cloud service product.

Visually outdated

Despite wide-ranging accolades, Basecamp 3 has had little evolution outside of its initial release, general  maintenance and software updates, and construction periods. One of the most common customer complaints surrounding Basecamp 3 is how “clunky” and “outdated” it feels during use.

The experience for new users fundamentally declines due to the lack of a slick, modern skin. One user on the TrustRadius customer review website said it best: “What I don’t like about Basecamp is that it feels like you are using an old product.” The UX in this case also leads to an environment that isn’t conducive to intensive collaboration.

House & Senate approval

The House of Representatives is approved to use Basecamp 3 for work that involves non-sensitive information, while Senate approval has yet to be determined. Basecamp 3 is not certified by the executive branch’s Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP).

Pricing

During the research for this review, we were unable to find any “government specific” pricing. In turn, the only pricing information Lincoln obtained revealed that organization can deploy Basecamp 3 on a flat rate of $99 per month. Billing begins after a 30-day free trial period. There is no “freemium” option.

What we think

If a congressional office needs a collaboration tool, options are limited. Basecamp 3, though lacking user experience and aesthetic updates, provides a solution that most congressional staff can employ. The flat rate also serves as a cost-effective option for offices and their particular departments, and committee staffers could even benefit from the centralization of workflows.


Screenshots

SCORE BREAKDOWN

User Interface

18/25

Cost

20/25

Differentiation

24/25

Effectiveness

21/25

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